Amazing Kid Alert!

Amazing Kid Alert!

As a 5th grader in the Hudson School District, Camden Frank was assigned to do a Passion Project.  Camden selected to use epilepsy for his topic as he has a family friend recently diagnosed and has seen how fear of the unknown and fear of the future took over this family.  Camden went above and beyond his assignment by preparing a 24 minute documentary on epilepsy.  He included information about seizure types, diagnosis, medications, and seizure first aid.  Camden used his entire 5th grade school year to produce this documentary.  He conducted interviews with epilepsy professionals as well as individuals living with epilepsy.  He did this all on his own while his mother filmed the interviews and drove him to where he needed to be.  It took Camden 3 attempts to make his documentary before finally being satisfied with the product.  His first was created on his iPod Touch and it was 5 minutes long.  He felt that it did not show the full picture of epilepsy.  The second was completed on his laptop and was ten minutes long.  He was still dissatisfied and did not feel that enough was presented in that time to help others understand the significance of epilepsy.  His final version was presented to the Epilepsy Association staff on June 16th.  EA staff were moved and in awe of his project and the kind and talented person that is Camden.  He was supported that day by his mother and sister and you could see the pride radiating from them.

Camden and his sisters had a lemonade stand in their neighborhood and raised $100 for the Epilepsy Association. Camden presented this check to Kelley Needham, CEO of the Epilepsy Association following his video presentation.  Camden and his sisters are planning on having 2 more fundraising lemonade stands for the Epilepsy Association. 

Camden is one in a million.  He truly is an amazing kid as he so generously spreads epilepsy awareness and education.  He is a true role model for children of all ages and we are honored to share the same passion for epilepsy and epilepsy awareness. 

Congratulations Camden on a job well done!

“A person’s a person, no matter how small.” -Dr. Seuss

Children CAN make a difference! Take Ryan Wood for example.  At 4 years old he is preparing for kindergarten, looking forward to summer T-Ball,  and enjoying being a big brother.  He is also making positive change for other children.  Ryan participated in the 2016 Winter Walk in which he rode his scooter the entire course at Strongsville Mall.  When asked why he did this he reported, “I want to help other kids. There are kids that have epilepsy that can’t be here for all the fun”.  Ryan spent several weeks campaigning by making phone calls to family and friends as well as posting a series of videos on Facebook to talk about epilepsy and how important it is to help others.  His videos were shared on many different Facebook pages and he received donations from several different states!  Every day after preschool he would ask to view his website to see who donated.  He then would call and thank them.   Ryan’s success was so much more than he and his family could have imagined!  He raised $825 for the Epilepsy Association which made him to top fundraiser for his age group.  Ryan attended  the

Purple Day Power Lunch at the Epilepsy Association in which he received an award for his efforts.  He was permitted time at preschool to share his award with the classes and talk about epilepsy and helping others.  Ryan’s preschool, St. Augustine Manor Child Enrichment Center, also hosts a Purple Day event in which the children learn about epilepsy through an in-service or puppet show, wear purple, and create purple projects.  The children created a poster this year that currently hangs for all visitors to the Epilepsy Association to see.

Ryan may only be 4 years old, but his efforts raised funds to provide support services to children with epilepsy and their families at no cost to them.

If you would like to learn more about the services that Ryan raised funds for, or helping your child’s school set up an in-service to provide epilepsy education, please call the Epilepsy Association at 216-579-1330.

2016 Featured Family    11th Annual Winter Walk

2016 Featured Family 11th Annual Winter Walk

Tillman Family—Kaycee Tillman
Nominated by: Allison Hamilton, Kaycee’s Aunt

Our story began after Thanksgiving 2014 when we noticed Kaycee did not know the answer to simple questions and just seemed “out of it”. My husband called and said something is wrong with Kaycee, she didn’t know what a brush was when I asked her to bring it to me. This was the second episode in less than a week, and our pediatrician’s office instructed us to take Kaycee to the ER immediately! They ran tests, but everything came back normal. They told us it was probably a virus and to wait it out.  It took time and persistence to figure out she was having absence seizures. After a month filled with hospital visits, doctor appointments and, seizure after seizure, were finally were able to start her on medication. From there, we began adding new medication after medication to the mix hoping one would work!

In March 2015 things took a turn in the wrong direction. Kaycee had a convulsive seizure called tonic clonic seizure. Close to an hour after the seizures started, it finally began to subside and we were in a helicopter on our way to Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus. This was my worst nightmare and the most helpless I’ve ever felt.

Kaycee came through that night and the seizure didn’t dull her shine. Following this change in seizures, she began having different types of seizures several times per day. The atonic seizures would make her fall with no warning at all including down the flight of stairs in our house several different times.  Her little body was covered in bruises from head to toe.

I admitted to myself these were not going away, so I began researching seizures.  I discovered a term I had never heard before “SUDEP” or sudden unexplained death of an epileptic person.  That’s where that pit in my stomach comes from – the fear of her slipping away from me while she’s sleeping. My research put me in contact with a wonderful network of individuals who are supportive and full of information when needed.

Currently, we still have no answers. While the seizures are not as severe, we can count on them showing up most days. We take it all in stride and try to let Kaycee be as independent.

The fact that my baby has to deal with these health issues is horrible, however, this path has put us in contact with wonderful individuals and organizations. Kaycee was granted a trip for our family to attend Epilepsy Awareness Day at Disneyland. It also allowed us to meet wonderful families with common concerns and gain valuable knowledge at the Epilepsy Expo. We met families with children from all over the epilepsy spectrum.

Since the beginning of our story, Kaycee has started kindergarten and is doing well at her school. They care for her and make sure even if she has a seizure she is able to stay at school for the day if possible. They have thought through all aspects of having her at school and continue to adjust and make necessary arrangements. I am so grateful we were lucky enough to start with such a wonderful and caring team.

In August, we began working to get Kaycee a trained seizure dog and through the generosity of so many of our family, friends and strangers we raised enough money. The outpouring of support was wonderful and more than I could have ever anticipated.

I choose to look at the positives and all the good that has come out of this experience. I will continue to be Kaycee’s biggest fan and fight for whatever she needs while continuing to follow Kaycee’s lead of positivity for her future.

We are proud to be one of this years Featured Families and we hope you’ll support, Kaycee, our family and the Epilepsy Association at the 11th Annual Winter Walk for Epilepsy on January 30!


March 26th is Purple Day, Epilepsy Awareness Day

Purple Day is Epilepsy Awareness Day

By: Beth Nuss

When my daughter Taylor was diagnosed with epilepsy I felt like it came out of nowhere. The seizures started subtly and went unnoticed for several months; still we knew something was wrong. Taylor was forgetting her homework, going to bed in her day clothes, and wearing the same outfit two days in a row. None of that would be considered normal behavior for a thirteen-year-old girl. When I spoke to the pediatrician about these occurrences, even she didn’t immediately suspect epilepsy. Even after a battery of tests, including an EEg, her condition couldn’t be labeled as epilepsy because there wasn’t any hard evidence.

 Finally one day we observed a seizure for the first time. I can only describe it as a short period of time where she was unaware of her surroundings followed by lip smacking and picking at her clothes. These seizures became more frequent and more pronounced as time went by. Eventually the evidence made it clear that Taylor had epilepsy. She was treated for the next eight years with many different anti-epileptic drugs, each of them failing after a few months of use, while the seizures became worse and very noticeable. I was fearful that she would get hurt.

 School work became an exhausting chore. Her memory grew increasingly worse as the seizures continued and the mind numbing drugs made her inattentive and tired. The school listened to my concerns and tried to understand but they were not equipped to deal with a child with epilepsy. They had never dealt with it before and were completely unaware when Taylor was seizing in school but I knew it was happening. After seven years of seizing at home sometimes ten to twenty times a week, it’s impossible to think that it never occurred between the hours of 8am and 2pm Monday thru Friday. I would like all teachers to be trained to notice when children in the classroom are behaving strangely, attempt to identify what is happening and report the actions to the child’s parents.

 I feel like there is a general unawareness of what epilepsy is and how it affects patients and their families in our society. Countless times I tried to explain to people who ask, “how’s Taylor doing?”, that the meds aren’t working, she’s still seizing, she has trouble learning, she can’t remember, she’s tired all the time, she doesn’t laugh and smile like she used to, she can’t drive, she can’t swim, etc. etc. etc. It is hard to understand when you don’t live with it daily and have never witnessed a seizure. And that’s one of the reasons I would like to bring more awareness to epilepsy.

 Fortunately Taylor was finally able to have epilepsy surgery and has been seizure free ever since. Her two-year anniversary is coming up on March 26, 2015, on Purple Day. She still takes some medications as a precaution but her activity level, confidence and overall disposition is markedly better. Our family will celebrate Purple Day together at The Harp with the Cleveland Epilepsy Association and we will continue to support the many families in our community struggling to come to terms with the diagnosis of epilepsy and the enormous challenges it brings.









Good People, Good Hearts

Tina has been a client of EA since fall of 2014. Tina’s family struggles significantly with finances and making sure that they have all that they need. Several individuals from Upsher-Smith pharmaceutical company wanted to help someone in need for the holidays. Out of their own pocket they donated money to a pit and reached out to the organizations that they work with for nominations of a client/family in need. Each person took their story to the group and a vote took place. Tina’s family won the vote and her family received a gift of money to help make the holidays special. Tina is newly married and has fourteen-year-old twins, a sixteen-year-old, a twenty-year-old son who is developmentally delayed, and a twenty one-year-old daughter who just got a new job and is finishing her GED. Tina’s agency worker presented this gift to her the week before Christmas and explained who it was from. Tina was so overwhelmed and grateful for this gift because she said that it meant that she could give her whole family the Christmas that she wanted for them that would otherwise be impossible due to her financial situation. Tina’s overwhelming emotion over receiving this gift was so touching, because she is so deserving of it. Tina’s agency worker assisted her in shopping for gifts and food for her family for Christmas and helped her make a list and follow the budget. Tina chose to buy practical gifts for her children since they needed new items like socks and underwear. After the shopping was done, Tina expressed that she wanted to make it a surprise for her family so she and her worker brought everything into her house without the rest of the family and hid the gifts from her children so they would be surprised on Christmas day. Tina’s family woke up on Christmas morning with gifts and a beautiful Christmas dinner all because these few individuals showed the true meaning of Christmas. In Tina’s mind these generous people are “Christmas angels” and will forever be in her heart.

“Coping with the Holidays with information provided to families in crisis” by Lacey Wood

Lacey with husband Joe and son Ryan at recent purple pumpkin day

Lacey with husband Joe and son Ryan at recent purple pumpkin day

As the song states this is “The most wonderful time of the year”, but there are still so many things that actually make it the most difficult time of the year.  For someone who has epilepsy, maybe along with a mental health condition or maybe a parent who has a child newly diagnosed with epilepsy, the holidays are the farthest thing from your mind  as you and/or your family may be struggling to deal with all that epilepsy has brought to your life and that of those who love you.

Here are the Epilepsy Association’s Top 3 Tips for Coping with the Holidays:

1. Take medication as normal. Holidays are busy times and it is easy to forget to take medication. Set an alarm for or find a creative way to remember to take medications.
2. Get enough sleep. Sleep is important in managing epilepsy. Keeping regular sleep patterns can assist in getting enough sleep despite all of the excitement and daily happenings.
3. Avoid alcohol. Drinking with medications can reduce the medications effectiveness which could increase the likelihood of a seizure.

The Epilepsy Association focuses on the strengths that each person has to empower them to make positive change in their lives and live more independently. If epilepsy affects you or your child, then the Epilepsy Association can help with the following programs:

  • Adult Case Management Program- Case Management services for adults who have epilepsy as well as a mental health condition. A one on one service with a qualified case manager, who is trained in epilepsy and mental health, to assist with the barriers that these conditions present in a person’s daily life, such as; benefits and entitlements, advocacy, doctors’ appointments, epilepsy education, and mental health treatment interventions.
  • Kids and Families Program- Support for the entire family where there is a child diagnosed with epilepsy.  A needs assessment is completed for everyone in the family to ensure that all members are supported.  The program provides connections to community resources to assist each individual within the family to cope with an epilepsy diagnosis.
  • Adult Support Group- Support group that meets the second Wednesday of each month at Lake West Hospital to provide support to adults with epilepsy as well as  support for other adults who support them.
  • PIKES (Parents Inspiring Kids with Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders) Parent Support Group- A support group for parents of children with epilepsy.  Parents come together to meet the second Tuesday of each month at the Parma Library to provide  support to each other as they work through the challenges of having a child with epilepsy.However you choose to spend the holidays this year the Epilepsy Association hopes that you have a wonderful and safe season!
    Medicaid is accepted and a sliding fee is available.
    Holiday closings: December 24th, 25th, 26th, 31st, and January 1st and 2nd.
    2831 Prospect Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115
    Phone: 216-579-1330
    Hours of Operation: Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
  • Visit us online at
    Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

The Epilepsy Association is a non- profit organization serving individuals with epilepsy in Northeast Ohio

Lacey is the Epilepsy Association Director of Community Programming

Beyond the Storm


Epilepsy Association 2831 Prospect Avenue Cleveland Ohio

Epilepsy Association
2831 Prospect Avenue
Cleveland Ohio

Anyone who lives with epilepsy understands how stigmatized epilepsy makes people feel.  We ask, where is our national spokespersons or why don’t we see media campaigns about epilepsy?  After all, the prevalence of epilepsy makes this neurological disorder a major public health problem.  Epilepsy is not benign.  As many as 50,000 people a year die prematurely from the consequences of seizures.  That is more than die from breast cancer.

I am at an age where friends frequently share stories about high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer and other illness, but never once have I heard anyone talk about epilepsy in public, even when I know they live with the disorder.  Yet, I have had many experiences where people, once they knew where I work, share quietly that they have epilepsy, as if to say, “I wish I could talk about this.”

Two years ago, the Epilepsy Association in Cleveland decided to help people talk about epilepsy.  With the help of some very generous Clevelanders, we commissioned Katherine Chilcote to paint a mural about the journey of epilepsy.  We then installed her 32 foot by 10 foot work of art on the outside of our building.  We did this to tell the story of epilepsy, generate awareness of the Epilepsy Association and to give persons with epilepsy a place in the community.  We felt art accomplishes these goals.

To conceive of the imagery, Katherine interviewed 34 individuals in Cleveland and Seattle who live with epilepsy, and she conducted one community charrette (a planning dialogue) during the spring of 2014 in Cleveland.  Through this process, Katherine gained insights into the shared experiences of living with epilepsy.  Her mural, “Beyond the Storm” reflects these shared experiences.

The mural’s imagery describes a voyage or journey that moves people beyond the circumstances of their health condition and life’s circumstances.  Katherine was inspired to paint images of birds and tornados as a reflection of the physical experiences of seizures.  Moving beyond these experiences are expressed through a vast horizon in the painting.

Katherine came to understand that living with epilepsy means being prepared to live each day anticipating seizures and overcoming the fear of the obstacles they create. Through this project, she hopes we come to understand that health obstacles give us an opportunity to grow into stronger people.  During the interviews, she heard a common expression of knowing one’s own strength to withstand the neurological storms of seizures and to move beyond these episodes. She heard that coping with the paradoxical realities of being one person while seizing and another while healthy were different for each individual.  And, she discovered that while epilepsy presents many commonalities, the epilepsy journey is uniquely experienced. For some, the condition is a minor distraction, while for others it presents huge obstacles.  It is a paradoxical life to be lost then found, and to be sick then healthy over and over again.

What Katherine wants us to realize through this work is that all persons with epilepsy have a powerful ability to accept oneself amidst a world that in uneducated about epilepsy, and often reacts cruelly based on the ancient stigma associated with the condition.  She thinks of this mural as a prelude, or wake up call, for the work needed to create a more accepting culture.

A few weeks ago, on a very cold  day, an idea that began many months ago finally became a reality.

Katherine Chilcote finishes installation of "Beyond the Storm"

Katherine Chilcote finishes installation of “Beyond the Storm”

Katherine installed “Beyond the Storm.”  This spectacular mural is her gift to the city, and to all those with epilepsy.

The following individuals/foundations contributed to the project and the Epilepsy Association is very grateful for their support.
The Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation,  Amy E. Kellogg, Frank H. Porter Jr., J. Patrick and Diane Spirnak, Tuni and Lee Chilcote, Kathy and James Pender, Reginald and Lynn Shiverick, Medical Mutual, Kitt and Mark Holcomb, Paula Sauer.  The project was also supported by:


We invite you to come see the mural at 2831 Prospect Avenue, Cleveland Ohio.  We also invite you to share your story by leaving a comment.  What do you think the images in the mural mean?


Written by:  Andrea Segedi

Andrea is on staff at the Epilepsy Association in Cleveland, and worked with the volunteers, donors and Katherine to create this mural.


Increasing Epilepsy Awareness by Michael Wesel

Scenes from the charette: Top row - Katherine Chilcote & Lucy and Lisa coming together.  Bottom row - creating scenes for Katherine to paint

Scenes from the charrette: Top row – Katherine Chilcote & Lucy and Lisa coming together. Bottom row – creating scenes for Katherine to paint

This is my sixth blog for the “Insights into Epilepsy” website. I have intractable epilepsy and over the last twenty years I have had break through seizures, with varied frequency and intensity. There is something really cool going on this fall at the Epilepsy Association. They have commissioned Cleveland Outdoor Muralist Katherine Chilcote to paint a forty foot-long by eight foot-high mural that will be placed on the east side of the association office building. The purpose of the mural is to increase awareness about epilepsy, bring attention to the agency and contribute to the revitalization of the neighborhood, by depicting the life experiences of people who live with epilepsy.

In order to help the artist complete the mural, the agency held a charrette, which is a community meeting or focus group where the stakeholders of a project get together and find a solution to an issue at hand. The people who attended shared their life stories and experiences living with epilepsy. This meeting helped Katherine create the imagery that is expressed in the mural. The mural depicts a public expression of the life experiences commonly shared by people who suffer from epilepsy. This fall you should drive by the Epilepsy Association offices and take look at the beautiful mural that Katherine is creating.

Sharing experiences at the mural charrette

Sharing experiences at the mural charrette

The agency has not yet reached its funding goal for this project. If you are interested in donating, make your checks payable to the Epilepsy Association and mail to 2831 Prospect Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115-2606. For more information contact the Epilepsy Association: Andrea Segedi, Director of Special Gifts & IT, (216)579-1330 or email her at

If you need information about epilepsy or know someone who needs help coping with epilepsy, the Epilepsy Association of North East Ohio might be able to help or let you know where you can get help. Give them a call at 216-579-1330.

Blogger Mike Wesel

Blogger Mike Wesel

A Father Remembers His Son – By Kenneth Lawrence

Lawrence Family Bottom Row: Kenneth and Romena  Top Row Left to Right: Kenneth Lawrence, II and Keenan

Lawrence Family
Bottom Row: Kenneth and Romena
Top Row Left to Right: Kenneth Lawrence, II and Keenan

Editor’s note: Several months ago, I had the privilege of meeting Kenneth and Romena Lawrence. The couple recently lost their son Keenan due to epilepsy. The Lawrence’s have chosen to remember Keenan by setting up a memorial fund in his honor Through this loving tribute to their remarkable son, they hope to support other parents raising a child with epilepsy. This month we are sharing Kenneth Lawrence’s tribute to his son Keenan by sharing some of his remembrances.

You asked me if I could give you some information about Keenan. There is so much to share, but I’ll begin Keenan’s story at the age of 11 when he started having seizures.

When Keenan realized what epilepsy was, and that he would live with epilepsy the rest of his life, he got very depressed.  One day he asked me how I would like to be like him.  I responded, “What do you mean?”  He said, “I’m a freak.”  That just hurt to hear, in fact, it wounded me.  Not knowing what to say, I tried to give him some encouraging words.

That night I prayed for God to give me the wisdom and knowledge to let my son know that he was not a freak.  When I woke up the next morning, something told me to go to the computer and Google “Famous People with Epilepsy.”  Hundreds of pictures of famous people popped up.  I was so excited that I woke Keenan up to show him what I had discovered.  That day, I left him on the computer and when I got back four hours later, Keenan was still there.  He told me that he wanted to read about everyone.  I’m sharing this story because after that point, Keenan never looked back.  Everything Keenan attempted, he mastered.

When Keenan was 8 years old, he invented at board game called Dice Cards.  If you would like to see an infomercial on the game, just Google Dice Cards by Kenny Lawrence.  The game is very entertaining.  Please keep in mind he was only 8 years old when he brought this game to the family.

Keenan showed an early interest in electronics.  At age 12, he found the very first video game that we bought one Christmas for Keenan and his older brother.  The game, Sega Genesis, wasn’t working and Keenan told me that he wanted to try and fix it.  I said that it would be good practice for him.  I remember coming home from work and finding Keenan in his room working away.  After about a month, I started to feel sorry for him, and thought maybe I should jump in and help him out.  Then one day, he told me that he fixed that game!  We went upstairs to his room, and sure enough, he had the game working.  We played that game all night long.  I went to school for electronics and was amazed at the troubleshooting techniques Keenan used.  He diagnosed the problem with the broken game as if he were a certified technician.

When Keenan was attempting to get into college, he needed an admissions letter from his doctor.  I was shocked when I got the letter.  It read as if Keenan were mentally retarded.  We never showed Keenan the letter.  Instead, I made an appointment with his doctor to let her know that for the last three years he was an honor roll student.  She had seen Keenan for eight years and did not know what was going on with him.  The doctor agreed to rewrite the admissions letter, and with her more favorable endorsement, Keenan entered college without any restrictions.

Keenan first went to a junior college, which he didn’t like very much.  He kept telling us that he wanted to go to a technical school.  We encouraged him to stay two years in a junior college, and then agreed to send him to ITT Technical College.  This is when Keenan started accelerating academically.  Keenan was on either the dean’s list or the honor roll the entire time he was at ITT.  During his last two years, he tutored many of his classmates who were of different ages and races.

When we lost Keenan this past January, he was just a few months away from graduating with his Bachelor’s Degree in Electronic Engineering.

I’m not sure how we will ever get over losing Keenan so early in his life.  He worked hard, overcame so much, and showed great promise.  To make sense of everything, we called the Epilepsy Association to see how we could help others.  This is why we started the Keenan Lawrence Memorial Fund.  We want to help other parents see the promise their children have too.  When we first learned of Keenan’s epilepsy, we needed to talk with someone who understood how to raise a child who has seizures.  We needed to know what to expect and how to handle the difficult situations that were bound to arise.  After some research, my wife, Romena, and I selected the Epilepsy Association because of their Kids & Family Program.  We understand how this program helps other families like ours.  As a family, we invite you to support all the Keenan’s who were lost too soon because of epilepsy.  For our friends and family who have asked, “what can I do?’ and for everyone who is moved by our story to help, we ask that you consider making a gift to the Keenan Lawrence Memorial Fund.  The Epilepsy Association has created a link so that donations are securely made on-line.  Here is the link to Keenan’s Memorial Fund.  All proceeds will go to the Epilepsy Association in Cleveland, Ohio.


Grandma Thornton is inspired by Macey Dillon’s Strength & Positive Attitude

2014 Featured Family - the Dillons

2014 Featured Family – the Dillons

Editor’s Note:  The 2014 Winter Walk is this Saturday – January 18, 2014.  The Walk is really two walks held simultaneously and the SouthPark Mall in Strongsville and the Great Lakes Mall in Mentor.  Registration is still open for the Walks.  The Dillon Family is a long time supporter of the Walk.  They walk to support Macey.  And her story was submitted by Grandma Thornton.  Macey and her family will be at SouthPark Mall.

Macey is a strong, normal child on the outside, but inside her brain is very busy. In March of 2009, Macey had her first grand mal seizure. Her pediatrician felt this was an isolated occurrence, but a Sleep Deprived EEG showed she had Benign Focal Epilepsy, which is usually seen only during sleep.

In July of the same year, Macey’s seizure activity increased so that her neurologist placed her on medication which eventually stopped her grand mal seizure activity. However, during that summer we began to notice that Macey seemed to be very clumsy. She would often trip and fall over nothing.  This could happen 30 times in a day!  It was then that Macey was diagnosed with a rare kind of seizure called “drop seizures”. This is almost never seen in children with Macey’s type of epilepsy and her physician had never seen one like it. With medication change, her seizures were able to stop and the entire family was able to take a deep sigh of relief!

In 2010, Macey entered 2nd grade. The first couple months went well, but then she began to show extreme cognitive regression and poor memory.  She also had sleep issues and napped frequently.  Once again Macey was tested and the results showed another sleep deprived EEG.  In April 2011 Macey was diagnosed with a rare form of epilepsy called ESES (Electrical Status Epilepticus during Sleep). She had continuous seizure activity for 85-95% of her sleeping hours, as well as some during the time she was awake. As a result, Macey was not moving short term memory into long term memory so what she learned one day would be forgotten the next day.

Again Macey rallied. With additional medication and special education intervention, Macey has improved tremendously. Today, she plays goalie for a traveling soccer team, plays basketball, and has many good friends. She is such a joy! We love her attitude and strength. Her parents and brother support her all the time. And, recently, Macey had another EEG and discovered she is now down to having seizures 25% of her sleep time!

We support the Epilepsy Association Winter Walk because the Association services help families cope with epilepsy.  We invite you to join us on Saturday, January 18th.  This is the one event where the entire Epilepsy Family – children and adults, their families, friends and care-givers come together to share our stories and support each other.